Tag Archives: collaboration

Jeanine’s Offering

I have been blessed this past month to meet Jeanine Guidry who is the founder and Executive Director of a non-profit band here in Richmond appropriately named Offering. Their tag line is “Making Music Make a Difference.”  Offering achieves this vision by giving their musical talents away in support of local non-profits.

I spent time with Jeanine this week and watched her with great interest as she offered herself to Embrace, Homeward, and the East End community.  I have never met such a giving person in my life.  I kept trying to figure out what her angle was.  What was she going to get out of any of this?  I could not answer this question until I read a devotional from Marketplace Leaders written by OS Hillman titled “The Spirit of Competition” which came out today in the TGIF email. Hillman writes

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Filed under Community Development, Leadership

Open Source Christianity

For the past year I have been reading anything I can find on creating missional structures that release peoples creativity into the community in a way that strengthens and builds up communities.  I discovered a post titled “Chance Favors a Connected Mind…& Leadership Network” by Eric Swanson in which Swanson shares the insights of Steven Johnson about how good ideas form through connections.

If you have read my book, you know that it was Swanson’s proposition that community transformation happens at the intersection of the needs of a community, the calling and capacities of the local church and the mandates of God that lead me to the path that ultimately resulted in my starting Embrace Richmond.  I am living proof of Steve Johnson’s theory that innovation happens slowly as we connect different ideas in new ways.  In taking Swanson’s theory, adding my own experiences and the stories and passions of the homeless friends I met along the way, Embrace Richmond was birthed.  As I have shared in the past, we are a very unique organization and I think most would agree, pretty innovative in the way we do ministry.

Swanson shares two video’s that capture the heart of Johnson’s theory. Swanson sums up Johnson’s main idea saying, “Here’s the big idea: Chance favors the connected mind. Rarely does a good idea emerge from a vacuum.”  The first video is an animated clip of Johnson’s ideas and the second clip is of Johnson sharing his ideas with a group.  Both are excellent.

Last week at the Communities First Association conference, Jeremy Morrman a technologies consultant with Arkeme, shared with our group how program development has changed over the past decade with more and more open source products being developed collaboratively by communities of developers verses through the traditional development process owned and managed by software companies.  The open source platforms are releasing creativity by connecting minds around a particular technological need.  The communities of developers are unpaid and commit to sharing any code they develop freely and openly with others.  These open platforms have resulted in exponential levels of creativity in the field as tens of thousands of people work together with a technology verses just the paid staff of some large software company.  The products created through this method are then offered free of charge to end users.

I have a hunch, as Johnson would say, that if we brought this idea of creative collaborative spaces together with the growing desire of Christians to be change agents in their communities and created low cost, flexible leadership structures, we could significantly reduce poverty in this county. It will require everyone to give freely what they have without looking for ownership or credit.  However these lightweight structures would allow for exponential multiplication of the ideas and thus the potential for a national huge impact.

So instead of Christians looking to paid church staff to coordinate missions events or to non-profits to build programs , we actually create an open platform where people of faith from all across a region regardless of religious affiliation, work collaboratively on a particular issue facing the community without concern for who gets the credit or the need to own the end product. From what I understand about open source projects, the management of a particular project is determined by the group but the end product belongs to the user community.

So, how can we create spaces for collaborative imagination?  Where  can these kinds of conversations happen?  What would a flat, shared leadership structure look like?

As you can see, I have more questions than answers right now but like the turtle in Johnson’s story board, I am on a slow crawl toward a eureka moment.  Your insights just might be the missing piece of the puzzle!  So please share.

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Filed under Leadership, missional church